Florence Ethel Lenon, 18751959 (aged 84 years)

Name
Florence Ethel /Lenon/
Given names
Florence Ethel
Surname
Lenon
Birth July 30, 1875 32
Baptism September 5, 1875 32 (aged 1 month)
Death of a motherEliza Brooker
May 20, 1877 (aged 1 year)
Note: LENON.— May 20th. suddenly, of premature confineme…

LENON.— May 20th. suddenly, of premature confinement, Eliza, the dearly beloved wife of Arthur Lenon, leaving a sorrowing husband and four infant children to mourn their loss, youngest daughter of Mrs. W. Brooker, of Wagga Wagga, late of Campbelltown.

Evening News (Sydney, NSW : 1869 - 1931) Monday 21 May 1877 p 2 Family Notices

Burial of a motherEliza Brooker
May 1877 (aged 1 year)
Note: Buried next to her grandfather Jonathan Brooker
Death of a maternal grandfatherWilliam Brooker
October 9, 1885 (aged 10 years)
Cause: William died from old age and natural decay
Note: He was sick for 8 days before death and was attended by Dr Eras Wren. The death information was his son James Brooker who was living at Lake Albert. The death was registered at Wagga Wagga on the 2nd of November 1885. Source: Death Certificate.
Burial of a maternal grandfatherWilliam Brooker
October 10, 1885 (aged 10 years)
Cemetery: Wagga Wagga Cemetery, Wagga Wagga, New South Wales, Australia
Death of a maternal grandmotherSophia Mary Mitton
January 17, 1892 (aged 16 years)
Burial of a maternal grandmotherSophia Mary Mitton
January 18, 1892 (aged 16 years)
MarriageJohn Norman Douglas CampbellView this family
1895 (aged 19 years)
Divorce
Newspaper Articles
June 1902 (aged 26 years)
Note: ARTICLE 1

ARTICLE 1

IN DIVORCE.

The hearing was continued, before Judge Stopson, yesterday, of the suit brought by John Norman Douglas Campbell, a Civil servant, for a divorce from Florence Ethel Campbell, on the ground of her adultery with Otto Henser, who was joined as co-respondent.

The respondent denied the allegations made against her, and cross-charged the petitioner with adultery and cruelty, on which grounds she, in turn, asked for relief. The petitioner denied the charges. There was no appearance on the part of the co-respondent.

The petitioner was in the box nearly the whole day, the evidence being unfit for publication. The case was not concluded when the court rose.

Evening News (Sydney, NSW : 1869 - 1931) Thursday 5 June 1902 p 6 Article.

ARTICLE 2

CAMPBELL v CAMPBELL.

Mr. Justice Simpson yesterday delivered his reserved judgment in the suit brought by John Norman Douglas Campbell, a Civil servant, for a dissolution of his marriage with Florence Ethel Campbell, on the ground of her adultery with Otto Heuser, who was joined as co-respondent.

The respondent denied the allegations, and cross charged the petitioner with misconduct and cruelty, upon which grounds she, in turn, asked for relief. The petitioner denied the charges made against him.

His Honour, having reviewed the evidence in the case, said there was not the slightest evidence before him that the respondent had an illness as she was alleged to have had.

There were other reasons why he came to the conclusion that the petitioner was all together in the wrong. Campbell admitted that he went to a certain house in Elizabeth-street— that he was there upon two occasions.

His explanation of the first visit to the house, which appeared to be an assignation house, was that he went there with some friend, who was looking for a young fellow, who was out from England.

He said he believed the place to be a lodging-house. He said, moreover, that he did not know then what he afterwards knew of the place. But after he did find out what the house was, he admitted that he was there on another occasion.

Upon that occasion he said he went there to find out something about a horse that was likely to win a race, and in which the woman who kept the place was interested, or, at all events, could give him some information about it. That was a very lame excuse for him to set up.

There was preponderating evidence that he had committed adultery. The conclusion he had come to was that the petitioner had, without just cause, deserted his wife, and the result of the adultery, which he found was committed as far back as the first year of their marriage, although forgiven, was revived by the subsequent desertion, and he had come to that conclusion in accordance with the decision in Lewis and Lewis.

Yet he could not help saying that it was very hard upon the petitioner. He granted a decree nisi, to be moved absolute in three months.

Evening News (Sydney, NSW : 1869 - 1931) Wednesday 25 June 1902 p 3 Article

Death of a fatherArthur Lenon
May 8, 1914 (aged 38 years)
Burial of a fatherArthur Lenon
May 1914 (aged 38 years)
Death of a sisterCharlotte Elizabeth Lenon
October 28, 1916 (aged 41 years)
Residence between 1926 and 1958 (aged 82 years)
Note: 1915 - 1926: Charlotte Street, Coolangatta

1915 - 1926: Charlotte Street, Coolangatta 1928: Douglas Street, Thursday Island 1932 - 1954: Bolton Estate, Coolangatta 1958: Boreen Point, Widgee

Harry worked as a builder, engineer and marine.

Death of a husbandJohn Norman Douglas Campbell
September 13, 1932 (aged 57 years)
Death of a sisterCaroline F. Lenon
May 18, 1954 (aged 78 years)
Burial of a sisterCaroline F. Lenon
May 19, 1954 (aged 78 years)
Death October 27, 1959 (aged 84 years)
Burial October 1959 (aged 84 years)
Family with parents
father
1914
Death: May 8, 1914New South Wales, Australia
mother
18431877
Birth: February 21, 1843 46 39Campbelltown, New South Wales, Australia
Death: May 20, 1877Liverpool, New South Wales, Australia
Marriage
Marriage: February 16, 1869Wagga Wagga, New South Wales, Australia
10 months
elder sister
18691954
Birth: November 28, 1869 26Camden Town, New South Wales, Australia
Death: May 18, 1954Penrith, New South Wales, Australia
2 years
elder sister
18711916
Birth: 1871 27Maryvale, Liverpool, New South Wales, Australia
Death: October 28, 1916Bonnie Blink, Coolangatta, Queensland, Australia
3 years
elder sister
1873
Birth: September 21, 1873 30Maryvale, Liverpool, New South Wales, Australia
23 months
herself
18751959
Birth: July 30, 1875 32Maryvale, Liverpool, New South Wales, Australia
Death: October 27, 1959Widgee, Queensland, Australia
Mother’s family with William Munro
step-father
mother
18431877
Birth: February 21, 1843 46 39Campbelltown, New South Wales, Australia
Death: May 20, 1877Liverpool, New South Wales, Australia
Marriage
Marriage: December 5, 1860Wagga Wagga, New South Wales, Australia
13 months
half-sister
1861
Birth: 1861 17Wagga Wagga, New South Wales, Australia
2 years
half-sister
1862
Birth: 1862 18Wagga Wagga, New South Wales, Australia
4 years
half-sister
Family with John Norman Douglas Campbell
husband
18601932
Birth: 1860Sydney, New South Wales, Australia
Death: September 13, 1932Brisbane, Queensland, Australia
herself
18751959
Birth: July 30, 1875 32Maryvale, Liverpool, New South Wales, Australia
Death: October 27, 1959Widgee, Queensland, Australia
Marriage
Marriage: 1895Newtown, New South Wales, Australia
Family with Private
husband
Private
herself
18751959
Birth: July 30, 1875 32Maryvale, Liverpool, New South Wales, Australia
Death: October 27, 1959Widgee, Queensland, Australia
Divorce

ARTICLE 1

IN DIVORCE.

The hearing was continued, before Judge Stopson, yesterday, of the suit brought by John Norman Douglas Campbell, a Civil servant, for a divorce from Florence Ethel Campbell, on the ground of her adultery with Otto Henser, who was joined as co-respondent.

The respondent denied the allegations made against her, and cross-charged the petitioner with adultery and cruelty, on which grounds she, in turn, asked for relief. The petitioner denied the charges. There was no appearance on the part of the co-respondent.

The petitioner was in the box nearly the whole day, the evidence being unfit for publication. The case was not concluded when the court rose.

Evening News (Sydney, NSW : 1869 - 1931) Thursday 5 June 1902 p 6 Article.

ARTICLE 2

CAMPBELL v CAMPBELL.

Mr. Justice Simpson yesterday delivered his reserved judgment in the suit brought by John Norman Douglas Campbell, a Civil servant, for a dissolution of his marriage with Florence Ethel Campbell, on the ground of her adultery with Otto Heuser, who was joined as co-respondent.

The respondent denied the allegations, and cross charged the petitioner with misconduct and cruelty, upon which grounds she, in turn, asked for relief. The petitioner denied the charges made against him.

His Honour, having reviewed the evidence in the case, said there was not the slightest evidence before him that the respondent had an illness as she was alleged to have had.

There were other reasons why he came to the conclusion that the petitioner was all together in the wrong. Campbell admitted that he went to a certain house in Elizabeth-street— that he was there upon two occasions.

His explanation of the first visit to the house, which appeared to be an assignation house, was that he went there with some friend, who was looking for a young fellow, who was out from England.

He said he believed the place to be a lodging-house. He said, moreover, that he did not know then what he afterwards knew of the place. But after he did find out what the house was, he admitted that he was there on another occasion.

Upon that occasion he said he went there to find out something about a horse that was likely to win a race, and in which the woman who kept the place was interested, or, at all events, could give him some information about it. That was a very lame excuse for him to set up.

There was preponderating evidence that he had committed adultery. The conclusion he had come to was that the petitioner had, without just cause, deserted his wife, and the result of the adultery, which he found was committed as far back as the first year of their marriage, although forgiven, was revived by the subsequent desertion, and he had come to that conclusion in accordance with the decision in Lewis and Lewis.

Yet he could not help saying that it was very hard upon the petitioner. He granted a decree nisi, to be moved absolute in three months.

Evening News (Sydney, NSW : 1869 - 1931) Wednesday 25 June 1902 p 3 Article

Residence

1915 - 1926: Charlotte Street, Coolangatta 1928: Douglas Street, Thursday Island 1932 - 1954: Bolton Estate, Coolangatta 1958: Boreen Point, Widgee

Harry worked as a builder, engineer and marine.