John Norman Douglas Campbell, 18601932 (aged 72 years)

Name
John Norman Douglas /Campbell/
Given names
John Norman Douglas
Surname
Campbell
Birth 1860
Baptism August 12, 1862 (aged 2 years)
MarriageFlorence Ethel LenonView this family
1895 (aged 35 years)
Divorce
Newspaper Article
June 1902 (aged 42 years)
Note: ARTICLE 1

ARTICLE 1

IN DIVORCE.

The hearing was continued, before Judge Stopson, yesterday, of the suit brought by John Norman Douglas Campbell, a Civil servant, for a divorce from Florence Ethel Campbell, on the ground of her adultery with Otto Henser, who was joined as co-respondent.

The respondent denied the allegations made against her, and cross-charged the petitioner with adultery and cruelty, on which grounds she, in turn, asked for relief. The petitioner denied the charges. There was no appearance on the part of the co-respondent.

The petitioner was in the box nearly the whole day, the evidence being unfit for publication. The case was not concluded when the court rose.

Evening News (Sydney, NSW : 1869 - 1931) Thursday 5 June 1902 p 6 Article.

ARTICLE 2

CAMPBELL v CAMPBELL.

Mr. Justice Simpson yesterday delivered his reserved judgment in the suit brought by John Norman Douglas Campbell, a Civil servant, for a dissolution of his marriage with Florence Ethel Campbell, on the ground of her adultery with Otto Heuser, who was joined as co-respondent.

The respondent denied the allegations, and cross charged the petitioner with misconduct and cruelty, upon which grounds she, in turn, asked for relief. The petitioner denied the charges made against him.

His Honour, having reviewed the evidence in the case, said there was not the slightest evidence before him that the respondent had an illness as she was alleged to have had.

There were other reasons why he came to the conclusion that the petitioner was all together in the wrong. Campbell admitted that he went to a certain house in Elizabeth-street— that he was there upon two occasions.

His explanation of the first visit to the house, which appeared to be an assignation house, was that he went there with some friend, who was looking for a young fellow, who was out from England.

He said he believed the place to be a lodging-house. He said, moreover, that he did not know then what he afterwards knew of the place. But after he did find out what the house was, he admitted that he was there on another occasion.

Upon that occasion he said he went there to find out something about a horse that was likely to win a race, and in which the woman who kept the place was interested, or, at all events, could give him some information about it. That was a very lame excuse for him to set up.

There was preponderating evidence that he had committed adultery. The conclusion he had come to was that the petitioner had, without just cause, deserted his wife, and the result of the adultery, which he found was committed as far back as the first year of their marriage, although forgiven, was revived by the subsequent desertion, and he had come to that conclusion in accordance with the decision in Lewis and Lewis.

Yet he could not help saying that it was very hard upon the petitioner. He granted a decree nisi, to be moved absolute in three months.

Evening News (Sydney, NSW : 1869 - 1931) Wednesday 25 June 1902 p 3 Article

Death September 13, 1932 (aged 72 years)
Obituary
Obituary
September 20, 1932 (7 days after death)

Note: MR. J. N. D. CAMPBELL.

MR. J. N. D. CAMPBELL.

Mr. John Norman Douglas Campbell, who died at Brisbane recently, had resided in Sydney, Papua, and Brisbane.

Mr. Campbell was born at Sydney on December 9, 1860, and was educated at the Sydney Grammar School. Subsequently he entered the Government service, and was for many years attached to the correspondence branch of the General Post Office, Sydney.

Subsequently, Mr. Campbell took a magisterial position at Port Moresby, Papua, but retired about 12 years ago. Later, Mr. Campbell resided at Brisbane until his death.

Mr. Campbell was the eldest son of the late John and Elizabeth Campbell, of Cromla, Roseville Park, Roseville, and a grandson of the late George and Frances Peat, of Fairview Park, Peats Ferry, Hawkesbury River.

Mr. Campbell is survived by two sisters and three brothers. His remains were interred privately in the Presbyterian portion of the Northern Suburbs Cemetery.

The Sydney Morning Herald (NSW : 1842 - 1954) Tuesday 20 September 1932 p 13 Article

Family with Florence Ethel Lenon
himself
18601932
Birth: 1860Sydney, New South Wales, Australia
Death: September 13, 1932Brisbane, Queensland, Australia
wife
18751959
Birth: July 30, 1875 32Maryvale, Liverpool, New South Wales, Australia
Death: October 27, 1959Widgee, Queensland, Australia
Marriage
Marriage: 1895Newtown, New South Wales, Australia
Private + Florence Ethel Lenon
partner’s partner
Private
wife
18751959
Birth: July 30, 1875 32Maryvale, Liverpool, New South Wales, Australia
Death: October 27, 1959Widgee, Queensland, Australia
Divorce

ARTICLE 1

IN DIVORCE.

The hearing was continued, before Judge Stopson, yesterday, of the suit brought by John Norman Douglas Campbell, a Civil servant, for a divorce from Florence Ethel Campbell, on the ground of her adultery with Otto Henser, who was joined as co-respondent.

The respondent denied the allegations made against her, and cross-charged the petitioner with adultery and cruelty, on which grounds she, in turn, asked for relief. The petitioner denied the charges. There was no appearance on the part of the co-respondent.

The petitioner was in the box nearly the whole day, the evidence being unfit for publication. The case was not concluded when the court rose.

Evening News (Sydney, NSW : 1869 - 1931) Thursday 5 June 1902 p 6 Article.

ARTICLE 2

CAMPBELL v CAMPBELL.

Mr. Justice Simpson yesterday delivered his reserved judgment in the suit brought by John Norman Douglas Campbell, a Civil servant, for a dissolution of his marriage with Florence Ethel Campbell, on the ground of her adultery with Otto Heuser, who was joined as co-respondent.

The respondent denied the allegations, and cross charged the petitioner with misconduct and cruelty, upon which grounds she, in turn, asked for relief. The petitioner denied the charges made against him.

His Honour, having reviewed the evidence in the case, said there was not the slightest evidence before him that the respondent had an illness as she was alleged to have had.

There were other reasons why he came to the conclusion that the petitioner was all together in the wrong. Campbell admitted that he went to a certain house in Elizabeth-street— that he was there upon two occasions.

His explanation of the first visit to the house, which appeared to be an assignation house, was that he went there with some friend, who was looking for a young fellow, who was out from England.

He said he believed the place to be a lodging-house. He said, moreover, that he did not know then what he afterwards knew of the place. But after he did find out what the house was, he admitted that he was there on another occasion.

Upon that occasion he said he went there to find out something about a horse that was likely to win a race, and in which the woman who kept the place was interested, or, at all events, could give him some information about it. That was a very lame excuse for him to set up.

There was preponderating evidence that he had committed adultery. The conclusion he had come to was that the petitioner had, without just cause, deserted his wife, and the result of the adultery, which he found was committed as far back as the first year of their marriage, although forgiven, was revived by the subsequent desertion, and he had come to that conclusion in accordance with the decision in Lewis and Lewis.

Yet he could not help saying that it was very hard upon the petitioner. He granted a decree nisi, to be moved absolute in three months.

Evening News (Sydney, NSW : 1869 - 1931) Wednesday 25 June 1902 p 3 Article

Obituary

MR. J. N. D. CAMPBELL.

Mr. John Norman Douglas Campbell, who died at Brisbane recently, had resided in Sydney, Papua, and Brisbane.

Mr. Campbell was born at Sydney on December 9, 1860, and was educated at the Sydney Grammar School. Subsequently he entered the Government service, and was for many years attached to the correspondence branch of the General Post Office, Sydney.

Subsequently, Mr. Campbell took a magisterial position at Port Moresby, Papua, but retired about 12 years ago. Later, Mr. Campbell resided at Brisbane until his death.

Mr. Campbell was the eldest son of the late John and Elizabeth Campbell, of Cromla, Roseville Park, Roseville, and a grandson of the late George and Frances Peat, of Fairview Park, Peats Ferry, Hawkesbury River.

Mr. Campbell is survived by two sisters and three brothers. His remains were interred privately in the Presbyterian portion of the Northern Suburbs Cemetery.

The Sydney Morning Herald (NSW : 1842 - 1954) Tuesday 20 September 1932 p 13 Article