Rose Hurley, 18821963 (aged 81 years)

Name
Rose /Hurley/
Given names
Rose
Surname
Hurley
Birth 1882 35 33
Death of a sisterMary Hurley
December 15, 1882 (aged 0)
Burial of a sisterMary Hurley
December 1882 (aged 0)
Birth of a brotherJohn William Ray Hurley
1884 (aged 2 years)
Death of a brotherJohn William Ray Hurley
March 20, 1885 (aged 3 years)
Burial of a brotherJohn William Ray Hurley
March 1885 (aged 3 years)
Death of a maternal grandfatherWilliam Ray
May 30, 1885 (aged 3 years)
Cause: Cancer of face, exhaustion
Note: Last seen by a medical attendant 10 days before death. Death informant was his son George. Source: death certificate supplied by National Centre of Biography.
Burial of a maternal grandfatherWilliam Ray
June 1, 1885 (aged 3 years)
Note: Burial witnesses were G.H. Gommeson and S.E. Freeman. Source: death certificate supplied by National Centre of Biography.
Birth of a sisterWinifred Hurley
1886 (aged 4 years)
Birth of a sisterIrene Hurley
1888 (aged 6 years)
Birth of a sisterMyra Hurley
1891 (aged 9 years)
Death of a maternal grandmotherEliza Jackson
December 24, 1906 (aged 24 years)
MarriageCecil Basden GastonView this family
1909 (aged 27 years)
Birth of a daughterRosa Mary Gaston
March 10, 1913 (aged 31 years)
Burial of a fatherWilliam Byrne Hurley
February 1915 (aged 33 years)
Note: Buried in the family vault
Death of a fatherWilliam Byrne Hurley
February 4, 1915 (aged 33 years)
Court
Newspaper Article
June 6, 1919 (aged 37 years)
Note: SOLDIER'S WELCOME

SOLDIER'S WELCOME

Arrested for Wife Maintenance

STORY IN DIVORCE COURT

Cecil Basden Gaston, a returned soldier, petitioned Mr. Justice Gordon, in the Sydney Divorce Court, to-day, to make an order against Rose Gaston (formerly Hurley) tor restitution of conjugal rights. On behalf of respond ent there were issues of desertion and cruelty.

The marriage took place in Sydney on February 13. 1909. Mr. Young and Mr. Perry (instructed by Messrs. Rose and Dawes) appeared for the petitioner, and Mr. Hammond (instructed by Messrs. M'Donald and Moffatt for the respondent.

Petitioner said he had always treated his wife well, but she could not agree with him. Trouble had been caused by her people, and in 1913 she left him. In 1915 he enlisted, and went to the war, and on his return he was arrested on a warrant taken out by his wife.

Mr. Hammond: Were you in the habit of throwing things at your wife when you were drunk?— I have never been drunk in my life. Respondent said her husband developed drinking habits soon after their marriage, and when he went on a spree he used to come home, and throw things at her.

In November 1911, her husband went away lo America without telling her of his intention. When he returned they went to live on an orchard and poultry farm near Parramatta. 'One day,' said witness, 'we had words concerning his behavior, and he picked up a shovel, and told me he would cut me down with it. I afterwards had to leave the house, and stay with friends because I was afraid of him.'

Witness said that when her husband was not drinking he was quite all right. He went to the war, and on his return she had him arrested for disobeying an order for maintenance. Before he went to the war they had not been living together, having separated in 1913.

Mr. Young: Then your welcome home to your husband when he returned from the war was to have him arrested?— I believe he was arrested. Up to the time he went to the war I could not find him.

Isn't it a fact that the reason you didn't take proceedings against him for desertion in 1913, 1914 and 1915 was that he had no means?— No; it was not. I didn't know where to find him.

His Honor dismissed the petition.

Evening News (Sydney, NSW : 1869 - 1931) Friday 6 June 1919 p 5 Article

Death of a motherRosina Ray
February 10, 1921 (aged 39 years)
Burial of a motherRosina Ray
February 11, 1921 (aged 39 years)
Death of a husbandCecil Basden Gaston
April 2, 1926 (aged 44 years)
Residence between 1930 and 1963 (aged 81 years)
Death of a sisterIrene Hurley
February 5, 1944 (aged 62 years)
Death of a sisterMyra Hurley
March 13, 1962 (aged 80 years)
Burial of a sisterMyra Hurley
March 1962 (aged 80 years)
Death May 23, 1963 (aged 81 years)
Burial May 1963 (aged 81 years)
Family with parents
father
18461915
Birth: February 22, 1846Campbelltown, New South Wales, Australia
Death: February 4, 1915"Binita", Petersham, New South Wales, Australia
mother
18481921
Birth: June 24, 1848 33 23Airds, New South Wales, Australia
Death: February 10, 1921"Binita", Marrickville, New South Wales, Australia
Marriage
Marriage: January 28, 1880Campbelltown, New South Wales, Australia
9 years
younger sister
18881944
Birth: 1888 41 39Campbelltown, New South Wales, Australia
Death: February 5, 1944Artarmon, New South Wales, Australia
4 years
younger sister
18911962
Birth: 1891 44 42Campbelltown, New South Wales, Australia
Death: March 13, 1962Marrickville, New South Wales, Australia
-4 years
younger sister
18861970
Birth: 1886 39 37Campbelltown, New South Wales, Australia
Death: September 19, 1970New South Wales, Australia
-5 years
elder sister
18811882
Birth: May 8, 1881 35 32Campbelltown, New South Wales, Australia
Death: December 15, 1882Campbelltown, New South Wales, Australia
20 months
herself
18821963
Birth: 1882 35 33Campbelltown, New South Wales, Australia
Death: May 23, 1963Ryde, New South Wales, Australia
3 years
younger brother
18841885
Birth: 1884 37 35Campbelltown, New South Wales, Australia
Death: March 20, 1885Campbelltown, New South Wales, Australia
Family with Cecil Basden Gaston
husband
18831926
Birth: February 9, 1883Atholney, Marrickville, New South Wales, Australia
Death: April 2, 1926Queensland, Australia
herself
18821963
Birth: 1882 35 33Campbelltown, New South Wales, Australia
Death: May 23, 1963Ryde, New South Wales, Australia
Marriage
Marriage: 1909Sydney, New South Wales, Australia
4 years
daughter
19131998
Birth: March 10, 1913 30 31Nurse Green's Hospital, Dulwich Hill, New South Wales, Australia
Death: October 23, 1998Mary Potter Nursing Home, Ryde, New South Wales, Australia
Court

SOLDIER'S WELCOME

Arrested for Wife Maintenance

STORY IN DIVORCE COURT

Cecil Basden Gaston, a returned soldier, petitioned Mr. Justice Gordon, in the Sydney Divorce Court, to-day, to make an order against Rose Gaston (formerly Hurley) tor restitution of conjugal rights. On behalf of respond ent there were issues of desertion and cruelty.

The marriage took place in Sydney on February 13. 1909. Mr. Young and Mr. Perry (instructed by Messrs. Rose and Dawes) appeared for the petitioner, and Mr. Hammond (instructed by Messrs. M'Donald and Moffatt for the respondent.

Petitioner said he had always treated his wife well, but she could not agree with him. Trouble had been caused by her people, and in 1913 she left him. In 1915 he enlisted, and went to the war, and on his return he was arrested on a warrant taken out by his wife.

Mr. Hammond: Were you in the habit of throwing things at your wife when you were drunk?— I have never been drunk in my life. Respondent said her husband developed drinking habits soon after their marriage, and when he went on a spree he used to come home, and throw things at her.

In November 1911, her husband went away lo America without telling her of his intention. When he returned they went to live on an orchard and poultry farm near Parramatta. 'One day,' said witness, 'we had words concerning his behavior, and he picked up a shovel, and told me he would cut me down with it. I afterwards had to leave the house, and stay with friends because I was afraid of him.'

Witness said that when her husband was not drinking he was quite all right. He went to the war, and on his return she had him arrested for disobeying an order for maintenance. Before he went to the war they had not been living together, having separated in 1913.

Mr. Young: Then your welcome home to your husband when he returned from the war was to have him arrested?— I believe he was arrested. Up to the time he went to the war I could not find him.

Isn't it a fact that the reason you didn't take proceedings against him for desertion in 1913, 1914 and 1915 was that he had no means?— No; it was not. I didn't know where to find him.

His Honor dismissed the petition.

Evening News (Sydney, NSW : 1869 - 1931) Friday 6 June 1919 p 5 Article