Mary Wade Family

Edward HarriganAge: 87 years18031891

Name
Edward Harrigan
Birth August 20, 1803 32 27
Note: Listed as Edward Wade
Death of a brotherEdward Harrigan
October 1803 (Age 42 days)
Burial of a brotherEdward Harrigan
October 25, 1803 (Age 2 months)
Christening December 23, 1804 (Age 16 months)
Note: Listed as Edward Haragan. Father listed as Edward Haragan.
Birth of a half-sisterElizabeth Broker
before 1806 (Age 2 years)

Death of a half-sisterElizabeth Broker
1806 (Age 2 years)

Birth of a half-brotherJohn Brooker
June 24, 1809 (Age 5 years)
Birth of a half-sisterElizabeth Brooker
December 7, 1810 (Age 7 years)
Birth of a half-sisterMary Brooker
November 28, 1812 (Age 9 years)
Birth of a half-brotherJames Brooker
May 30, 1814 (Age 10 years)
Marriage of a parentJonathan BrookerMary WadeView this family
February 10, 1817 (Age 13 years)
Christening of a half-brotherJohn Brooker
April 13, 1819 (Age 15 years)
Baptism of a half-sisterElizabeth Brooker
April 13, 1819 (Age 15 years)
Christening of a half-sisterMary Brooker
April 13, 1819 (Age 15 years)
Christening of a half-brotherJames Brooker
April 13, 1819 (Age 15 years)
Death of a fatherTeague Harrigan
about 1825 (Age 21 years)
Source:

Footnote: Julie Webster

Residence September 1825 (Age 22 years)
Note: In 1825 Edward was working for his step father Jonathan Brooker at Campbelltown, NSW
MarriageMary Ann WebberView this family
1833 (Age 29 years)
Birth of a daughter
#1
Mary Anne Harrigan
December 15, 1835 (Age 32 years)
Christening of a daughterMary Anne Harrigan
December 27, 1835 (Age 32 years)
Death of a maternal grandmotherMary Smith
November 1836 (Age 33 years)
Burial of a maternal grandmotherMary Smith
November 8, 1836 (Age 33 years)
Birth of a daughter
#2
Elizabeth Harrigan
June 11, 1837 (Age 33 years)
Christening of a daughterElizabeth Harrigan
July 9, 1837 (Age 33 years)
Birth of a son
#3
James Edward Harrigan
May 28, 1839 (Age 35 years)
Christening of a sonJames Edward Harrigan
June 23, 1839 (Age 35 years)
Census 1841 (Age 37 years)
Note: Living at Fairy Meadow in a wood house owned by Edward. 5 people were residing there
Death of a wifeMary Ann Webber
February 7, 1854 (Age 50 years)
Burial of a wifeMary Ann Webber
February 1854 (Age 50 years)
Marriage of a childRobert John SpinksElizabeth HarriganView this family
April 25, 1854 (Age 50 years)
MarriageJane Willison WoodView this family
August 17, 1854 (Age 50 years)
Birth of a daughter
#4
Sarah Jane Harrigan
1855 (Age 51 years)
Birth of a son
#5
William Harrigan
December 22, 1857 (Age 54 years)
Christening of a sonWilliam Harrigan
February 14, 1858 (Age 54 years)
Marriage of a childJames Edward HarriganAmelia Ann ThorntonView this family
September 25, 1859 (Age 56 years)
Death of a motherMary Wade
December 17, 1859 (Age 56 years)
Note: Citation of original death certificate
Burial of a motherMary Wade
December 20, 1859 (Age 56 years)
Note: Citation of original death certificate
Birth of a daughter
#6
Louisa Emily Harrigan
March 22, 1860 (Age 56 years)
Christening of a daughterLouisa Emily Harrigan
May 6, 1860 (Age 56 years)
Birth of a daughter
#7
Alice Clara Harrigan
August 5, 1862 (Age 58 years)
Christening of a daughterAlice Clara Harrigan
September 28, 1862 (Age 59 years)
Death of a half-sisterElizabeth Brooker
about 1863 (Age 59 years)
Note:

I can't locate evidence of Elizabeth's death. A few researchers on Ancestry have recorded her death as being in 1865. The only death listed for an Elizabeth Low/e in the New South Wales BDM is a different Elizabeth. This Elizabeth was 21 at the time of death when cross referenced with Trove records.

The majority of researchers have listed her death as being 1863 in Victoria. There is only one Eliza Lowe listed for that year, but she was a 1 year old.

There is an Elizabeth Low death record for 1853 at Camperdown, Newtown, New South Wales. The age of her death matches Elizabeth's year of birth. This could possibly be the right match

Sandie McKoy

Death of a daughterMary Anne Harrigan
August 7, 1870 (Age 66 years)
Burial of a daughterMary Anne Harrigan
August 1870 (Age 66 years)
Death of a half-brotherJames Brooker
March 15, 1880 (Age 76 years)
Cause: James died from Paralysis. He was attended by Dr W. Smith Thomas.
Note: The death informant was his wife Elizabeth. The death was registered at Wollongong on the 26th of April 1880. Source: copy of death certificate.
Burial of a half-brotherJames Brooker
March 17, 1880 (Age 76 years)
Note: Witnesses to the burial were G. W. Commins and John Williams.
Marriage of a childWilliam HarriganElizabeth Ann WilliamsonView this family
October 6, 1881 (Age 78 years)
Marriage of a childFrederick William MayneLouisa Emily HarriganView this family
September 25, 1884 (Age 81 years)
Marriage of a childCharles Kevern ThornSarah Jane HarriganView this family
1884 (Age 80 years)
Marriage of a childCunningham CaldwellAlice Clara HarriganView this family
1885 (Age 81 years)
Death of a brotherWilliam Brooker
October 9, 1885 (Age 82 years)
Cause: William died from old age and natural decay
Note: He was sick for 8 days before death and was attended by Dr Eras Wren. The death information was his son James Brooker who was living at Lake Albert. The death was registered at Wagga Wagga on the 2nd of November 1885. Source: Death Certificate.
Burial of a brotherWilliam Brooker
October 10, 1885 (Age 82 years)
Cemetery: Wagga Wagga Cemetery, Wagga Wagga, New South Wales, Australia
Death of a half-brotherJohn Brooker
December 7, 1886 (Age 83 years)
Cause: John died from Gastritis and Debility. He was attended by Dr. B.J. Newsmarch.
Note: The death informant was John's nephew W. McKenzie, who was living at Wilds Meadow. The death was registered on the 9th of December, 1886 at Robertson, NSW. Source: copy of death certificate.
Burial of a half-brotherJohn Brooker
December 9, 1886 (Age 83 years)
Note: Witnesses to the burial were C. Tildsley and A. Kirkland.
Death of a sisterSarah Wade
July 5, 1887 (Age 83 years)
Cause: Sarah died from old age and debility
Note: At the time of her death, Sarah was living with her grand daughter and her family at Argyle Street, Picton. The death information was John Warters, the husband of her grand daughter. Source: Death Certificate.
Burial of a sisterSarah Wade
July 7, 1887 (Age 83 years)
Note: Picton Anglican Cemetery is located on the grounds of St Marks Church of England, Picton.
Death of a daughterLouisa Emily Harrigan
January 13, 1889 (Age 85 years)
Burial of a daughterLouisa Emily Harrigan
January 15, 1889 (Age 85 years)
Death of a half-sisterMary Brooker
September 29, 1890 (Age 87 years)
Cause: Mary died from Chronic Rheumatic Gout and Hepatitis. She was attended by Dr M. O'Connor.
Note: The death informant was her son Henry Angel, who was living at Wagga Wagga. The death was registered at Wagga Wagga on the 30th of September 1890. Source: copy of death certificate
Burial of a half-sisterMary Brooker
October 1, 1890 (Age 87 years)
Note: Witnesses to the burial were John Croft and A. Brooker. Source: copy of death certificate. Grave Location: ANG-R-6-0025
Death July 9, 1891 (Age 87 years)
Cause of death: Edward died from senility and epithelioma of the lip. He was attended by Dr J. Jarvie Hood.
Note: The death information was his son William Harrigan who was living at Fairy Meadow. The death was registered at Wollongong on 10 July 1891. Source: death certificate supplied by the National Centre of Biography, ANU.
Burial July 11, 1891 (2 days after death)
Cemetery: Church of England Cemetery, Wollongong, New South Wales, Australia
Note:

Funeral Notice in Illawara Mercury, Saturday 11 July 1891 THE Friends of Mr. E. HARRIGAN, of Balgownio Lane are respectfully invited to attend his FUNERAL to move from his late residence, THIS DAY (SATURDAY), at .2 o'clock, for the new C. E. Cemetery, Wollongong.

Note: Burial witnesses were Joseph Makin and A. Latter. Source: death certificate supplied by the National Centre of Biography, ANU.
Obituary
Obituary
July 14, 1891 (5 days after death)
Note:

By the death of Mr. Edward Harrigan, of Fairy Meadow, on Friday last, the oldest Australian native living up to that time, so far as we are aware, passed away.

References to this gentleman having appeared in the Mercury from time to time of late years, many of our readers are therefore familiar with the fact that he was in all probability the oldest native in all Australia, as well as in reality the oldest in the Illawarra district.

He was born in Sydney on the 20th August, 1803, or only fifteen years after the founding of the colony in 1788 by Governor Phillip. The part, of the then future great city where he was born was what eventually became Phillip-street.

In the early days of the boy, his parents removed from Sydney to Campbelltown. At that time Sydney was only a bush township of small magnitude, and possessing little of the convenience and advantages of civilisation. And as regarded Campbelltown, it was considered in those days a far interior locality, with its wooded wilderness and hordes of aboriginal inhabitants.

At Campbelltown young Harrigan resided until he was fifteen years old, having in the meanwhile attended a night school for about six months. This was the only schooling he ever received, and in those days, and under such circumstances, any youth was fortunate to have even so much advantage in the way of education.

At that early age, or about seventy-two years ago, he went as a lad with a party of cedar sawyers to work in the ranges above what afterwards was termed Bulli. There he remained for several years, and with the whole party suffered privations and hardships of which modern residents of the colony can form no conception.

The cedar, when sawn on the eastern side of the range, had to be carried shoulderwise up to the tableland, whence it was conveyed to Sydney, via Campbelltown or Liverpool in the crudest of manner, and over the roughest of bush made tracks.

Some few months after his arrival at the Bulli ranges he made his way to where Wollongong afterwards sprung into existence. His object was to endeavor to procure some food from a small vessel that was known to trade now and again to that place for cedar. He travelled through the bush along the coast, but was doomed to bitter disappointment. On arrival at the future site of Wollongong, he could not find either the vessel he was looking for nor any white inhabitant.

Disappointed and almost famished, he had to return to the haunt of the party in the mountain, and as the stock of food there, such as it was, was done, he had to make his way at once as best he could to Campbelltown, where the supplies were not much better.

Having attained to manhood, he in course of time applied to Government for a grant of land, and his request having been complied with, he selected the piece of land at Fairy Meadow, where with the exception of a few years, he resided until his death.

About forty-two years ago he joined a friend of his (the late Mr. Henry Angel, of Wagga Wagga), in taking up a large piece of land near Hay for squatting purposes. He remained there for about three years, but squatting not being congenial to his inclinations, he relinquished it, and returned to his favorite Illawarra once again. And there he stayed all the remaining years of his life.

Of Mr. Harrigan, it has to be said that he was one of the most honest minded and guileless of men. He was of a most retiring disposition, and in simple manner and demeanor was the very type of the now almost bygone race that pioneered the settlement of this colony, which generally means the settlement of all Australia, as far as such has been done.

It is almost needless to state that he was strong and healthy in a marked degree. He was twice married, and leaves a widow, two sons, three daughters, thirty-two grand-children, and twenty-two great grand-children.

About a year ago he suffered from a severe attack of bronchitis, from which he never fully recovered strength, and a cancer having formed on his lips hastened his end. Thus lived and thus died a man who, though humble and retired at Fairy Meadow, was in a historic sense perhaps the most remarkable man in all Australia during the last few years of his existence.

A goodly number of persons paid their last respects to the deceased on Saturday by following his remains to the Church of England new cemetery, at Wollongong, where the Rev. T. O. Ewing, R.D., officiated.

Original publication: Illawarra Mercury (Wollongong, NSW), 14 July 1891, p 2.

Family with parents - View this family
father
mother
Marriage:
elder sister
2 years
elder brother
23 months
elder brother
3 years
elder brother
2 years
elder brother
Edward Harrigan
Birth: about 1800 29 24Sydney, New South Wales, Australia
Death: October 1803Sydney, New South Wales, Australia
4 years
himself
Mother’s family with Jonathan Brooker - View this family
step-father
mother
Marriage: February 10, 1817St Lukes Church of England, Liverpool, New South Wales, Australia
-10 years
half-sister
4 years
half-brother
17 months
half-sister
Elizabeth Brooker
Birth: December 7, 1810 50 34Hawkesbury District, New South Wales, Australia
Death: about 1863Victoria, Australia
2 years
half-sister
18 months
half-brother
Family with Jane Willison Wood - View this family
himself
wife
Marriage: August 17, 1854St Michaels Church of England, Wollongong, New South Wales, Australia
8 years
daughter
-2 years
daughter
Louisa Emily Harrigan Christening 1860Louisa Emily Harrigan
Birth: March 22, 1860 56 40Fairy Meadow, New South Wales, Australia
Death: January 13, 1889Crystal Street, Petersham, New South Wales, Australia
-4 years
daughter
3 years
son
Family with Mary Ann Webber - View this family
himself
wife
Marriage: 1833St Michael's Church, Wollongong, New South Wales, Australia
4 years
daughter
2 years
son
-3 years
daughter
Mary Anne Harrigan
Birth: December 15, 1835 32 38Wollongong, New South Wales, Australia
Death: August 7, 1870Wollongong, New South Wales, Australia

Birth

Listed as Edward Wade

Christening

Listed as Edward Haragan. Father listed as Edward Haragan.

Residence

In 1825 Edward was working for his step father Jonathan Brooker at Campbelltown, NSW

Census

Living at Fairy Meadow in a wood house owned by Edward. 5 people were residing there

Death

The death information was his son William Harrigan who was living at Fairy Meadow. The death was registered at Wollongong on 10 July 1891. Source: death certificate supplied by the National Centre of Biography, ANU.

Burial

Funeral Notice in Illawara Mercury, Saturday 11 July 1891 THE Friends of Mr. E. HARRIGAN, of Balgownio Lane are respectfully invited to attend his FUNERAL to move from his late residence, THIS DAY (SATURDAY), at .2 o'clock, for the new C. E. Cemetery, Wollongong.

Burial

Burial witnesses were Joseph Makin and A. Latter. Source: death certificate supplied by the National Centre of Biography, ANU.

Obituary

By the death of Mr. Edward Harrigan, of Fairy Meadow, on Friday last, the oldest Australian native living up to that time, so far as we are aware, passed away.

References to this gentleman having appeared in the Mercury from time to time of late years, many of our readers are therefore familiar with the fact that he was in all probability the oldest native in all Australia, as well as in reality the oldest in the Illawarra district.

He was born in Sydney on the 20th August, 1803, or only fifteen years after the founding of the colony in 1788 by Governor Phillip. The part, of the then future great city where he was born was what eventually became Phillip-street.

In the early days of the boy, his parents removed from Sydney to Campbelltown. At that time Sydney was only a bush township of small magnitude, and possessing little of the convenience and advantages of civilisation. And as regarded Campbelltown, it was considered in those days a far interior locality, with its wooded wilderness and hordes of aboriginal inhabitants.

At Campbelltown young Harrigan resided until he was fifteen years old, having in the meanwhile attended a night school for about six months. This was the only schooling he ever received, and in those days, and under such circumstances, any youth was fortunate to have even so much advantage in the way of education.

At that early age, or about seventy-two years ago, he went as a lad with a party of cedar sawyers to work in the ranges above what afterwards was termed Bulli. There he remained for several years, and with the whole party suffered privations and hardships of which modern residents of the colony can form no conception.

The cedar, when sawn on the eastern side of the range, had to be carried shoulderwise up to the tableland, whence it was conveyed to Sydney, via Campbelltown or Liverpool in the crudest of manner, and over the roughest of bush made tracks.

Some few months after his arrival at the Bulli ranges he made his way to where Wollongong afterwards sprung into existence. His object was to endeavor to procure some food from a small vessel that was known to trade now and again to that place for cedar. He travelled through the bush along the coast, but was doomed to bitter disappointment. On arrival at the future site of Wollongong, he could not find either the vessel he was looking for nor any white inhabitant.

Disappointed and almost famished, he had to return to the haunt of the party in the mountain, and as the stock of food there, such as it was, was done, he had to make his way at once as best he could to Campbelltown, where the supplies were not much better.

Having attained to manhood, he in course of time applied to Government for a grant of land, and his request having been complied with, he selected the piece of land at Fairy Meadow, where with the exception of a few years, he resided until his death.

About forty-two years ago he joined a friend of his (the late Mr. Henry Angel, of Wagga Wagga), in taking up a large piece of land near Hay for squatting purposes. He remained there for about three years, but squatting not being congenial to his inclinations, he relinquished it, and returned to his favorite Illawarra once again. And there he stayed all the remaining years of his life.

Of Mr. Harrigan, it has to be said that he was one of the most honest minded and guileless of men. He was of a most retiring disposition, and in simple manner and demeanor was the very type of the now almost bygone race that pioneered the settlement of this colony, which generally means the settlement of all Australia, as far as such has been done.

It is almost needless to state that he was strong and healthy in a marked degree. He was twice married, and leaves a widow, two sons, three daughters, thirty-two grand-children, and twenty-two great grand-children.

About a year ago he suffered from a severe attack of bronchitis, from which he never fully recovered strength, and a cancer having formed on his lips hastened his end. Thus lived and thus died a man who, though humble and retired at Fairy Meadow, was in a historic sense perhaps the most remarkable man in all Australia during the last few years of his existence.

A goodly number of persons paid their last respects to the deceased on Saturday by following his remains to the Church of England new cemetery, at Wollongong, where the Rev. T. O. Ewing, R.D., officiated.

Original publication: Illawarra Mercury (Wollongong, NSW), 14 July 1891, p 2.